Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

https://www.bluevolt.com/bluevoltblog/does-online-training-lead-to-more-sales

Advertisements

Every day, we seem to be making America greater, and greater, and greater again.

In just one week we have seen 14 bombs sent to past presidents and other major critics of Donald Trump AND the worst massacre of Jews in the history of the United States, with 11 people dead.

The country in which I live is no longer some shining light on some hill. We keep hearing people say “Make America Great Again” but that is clearly nonsense.

Perhaps one of the good things about Donald Trump being president of the United States is that China and Japan are now talking about healing their long-lasting wounds and working together. That is a good thing for the world. But, that is a bad thing for our country because it means that we will not remain the world’s great economic superpower.

So, we continue down the path of making America worse. I am among those who deeply loves the country in which I live. It absolutely kills me to see the wanton destruction of what was once the greatest democracy on Earth. That is all I have to say except to urge all of us to pray for the murdered Jewish worshipers and to pray that what little remain of our executive branch will have the balls to call the bombs what they are: assassination attempts. Such evil is NEVER even acceptable to ponder.

Enough!!!!

This is the blog post I planned to right only much, much better!

The brain is sooooo cool!

I just came back from The Beautiful Brain: The Drawings of Santiago Ramón y Cajal exhibit at NYU’s Grey Gallery. For those who don’t know, Ramon y Cajal (or Cajal as he is commonly refered to) was the father of neuroanatomy. He shared the Nobel Prize with Camillo Golgi in 1906 for using Golgi’s staining method to show that neurons were separate cells (Neuron Doctrine).

What I learned from The Beautiful Brain exhibit is Cajal was an artist and that in fact he approached the nervous system using an artistic approach rather than a modern data-centric style. His drawings are art and not data. And given his track record, I think that modern science, obsessed as it is with data, could benefit from a look at the lessons offered by Cajal.

Cajal’s neurons and brains, retinas and hippocampi rival in artistry the drawings of da Vinci, Dürer, Rembrandt, Kollewitz…

View original post 2,608 more words

Help me reach my goal of $500 for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention walk. Just click here.

Thanks for helping AFSP!

Love you all!

 

 

As an amateur poet and a big collector of poetry books I must say that I am not typically a fan of books by poets that are not poetry. Poetics is about concision. Novels and essays are generally not. I don’t really view them as requiring comparable skills. 

In at least one case I have been proven very wrong. Patricia Lockwood’s essay “Priestdaddy” is very close to perfect. The book is a masterful integration of the poignancy shown in her “gone viral” poem “Rape Joke”, the irreverent abandon of her Twitter feed, a sense of humor rivaling Jenny Lawson, an honest exploration of family, a childhood of Catholicism, the sexual honesty she is known for, and an utter love of language. This book is a very rare case of perfect balance between prosody and poetics. I applaud her.

The story of Priestdaddy is both very common and insanely unique. It is common because it tells a story that is becoming increasingly common: A married 30-something moving back home with mom and dad. No big deal there. The insane uniqueness comes from the fact that dad is one of the very rarest of Catholic priests: A married one. 

I did not know that it was even possible to be a married Catholic priest. Apparently, one can get the calling anytime and you don’t have to reset you virginity to do it. Also, apparently, you do have to meet certain criteria that can be defined by testing. Step one is that you and the family must be tested to insure you are not insane. Considering the sorry state of child sex abuse in the “one true church” (a topic poignantly covered in the book) it seems they’d be better off giving that test to the celebate virgin applicants, But that is a much bigger topic. In any case, Lockwood’s description of the “test” is absolutely hilarious. 

Daddy was not content as a Lutheran and was – family and all – dirty underwear and all – rags in the sink and all – electric guitar, guns, mysogeny, football, living half-naked in front of the TV, hamburgers and pork rinds, and all – into the holy Catholic priesthood.

Feisty, readheaded, subversively subservient mom is her own piece of work. She cooks huge meals for the seminarians without even flinching when Fr. Lockwood asks why it took so long. She washes piles of her beloved “Priesthubby’s” (I just made that up but I officially herein offer it to you, Trish, if you want the title for a sequel; because it’s a fuckin’ awesome word) dirty underwear. She care’s deeply, perhaps too deeply, about the safety of her children. And… she is as hilariously odd in her own way as daddy is in his. 

I won’t keep going with the character descriptions because I don’t want to spoil too much. Let’s just say that Lockwood’s own post-religion, atheist husband and her “baybay” grunting sister are characterized as wonderfully as dad and mom.

As for Lockwood herself, she portrays her childhood, her sexuality, her ability to drink martinis while seductively showing her belly to vulnerable drunk seminarians, her mastery in turning on her priest-daughter mode at ordaination parties, and her uncanny early love of language with an amazing candor. I hate to again compare her to Jenny Lawson but I really see tha; I genuinely intend that comparison to be a complement. 

Twice, I compared Priestdaddy with the writing of Jenny Lawson. Now I need to state a difference. Patricia Lockwood is unique among poets because she can write an essay this well. But she differs from other essay writers and especially humorists in the clarity, beauty, use of analogy, grammar, vocabulary, and sentence construction, of her writing. I fear that if I give examples, of which there are a multitude, I’ll ruin something for you. But, here are just a couple:

<All my life I have overheard, all my life I have listened to what people will let slip when they think you are part of their we. A we is so powerful. It is the most corrupt and formidable institution on earth. Its hands are full of the crispest and most persuasive currency. Its mouth is full of received, repeating language. The we closes its ranks to protect the space inside it, where the air is different. It does not protect people. It protects its own shape.>

And…

<There has never been a trilogy he didn’t like, and if you don’t understand why, I have three words for you: father, son, and Holy Spirit. Foremost among his favorites is the original Star Wars trilogy, which he fervently believes is about priests in space, and the first three Alien films, which he believes are about how all women are destined to be mothers.>

Those are not even among what I consider the highlights. I won’t give you my favorites because, as I’ve implied, you deserve to laugh and cry and roll your eyes, and vent, and laugh and cry some more all by yourself. I won’t ruin that.

I never would have expected a poet I love to also write one of my favorite bits of prose. But, Patricia Lockwood has done it. Not only should you read this book but you should listen to it too. The Audible Studios production is read by the author and no one can say “BAYBAY”, talk about dirty rags, and tell of showing her erotic stomach to Italian seminarians like the writer herself. 

For the record, I adore this book. 

Also for the record, Ms. Lockwood, your long arms are NOT your only beauty.

Dear Mr. Trump,

I just got off the telephone with a Latina friend. Her high school aged daughter has struggled with depression problems that have largely been under control recently. Today she had a very serious breakdown. I asked my friend what happened.

My friend is Mexican but is married to a Caucasian. She lives in a small town who’s population is primarily middle-class whites. Her daughter has never before experienced racism. This is because, as I found out today her friends have “always considered her white”. 

Two days ago you were elected President. Yesterday, on a school field trip, for the first time, her long-time friends began teasing her about being “a Mexican”. Last night, after the field trip, this lovely young lady was overwhelmed by racist text messages. She awoke this morning in dispair having lost all of the positive changes to her emotional condition.

Mr. Trump, you say you are not a racist; you say you want to bring all Americans together; you say that white supremacist support is not indicative of your values. I desperately want to believe that but, less than 2 days after your election I have a friend whose family is experiencing racism that they had never before seen.

Prove to me this isn’t what you want. Speak out to your supporters and tell them to teach their children not to hurt others. If you can’t do at least that then I see no path to decency.