Archive for the ‘Experiences’ Category

I’m not posting this to turn my blog into a poetry critique class. There are plenty of issues to complain about here. I’m posting it because I wrote it 20 years ago this week, while sitting in a hotel room in Amsterdam. Take it for what it’s worth and remember all those who died 20 years ago today.

September 11, 2001:
	Three planes
               destroy three buildings
that once stood
         taller than the
		cedars of Lebanon.

Tijuana, 1963:
	There’s a picture of mom,
               and dad, and me
with sombreros.
	I don’t remember.
		To early.

Nearly three-thousand people die:
	Business or pleasure?
No. Life or death!
        In the same week we Jews
pray for renewal.

San Diego, 1979:
	A wedding in powder blue.
Yes, it’s true,
	powder blue
tuxedos.

Just a few crazed bastards,
	some barely 30 years of age,
		chose death
to harvest and discard
	the entire infrastructure
		of humanity.

And where are
	the Pope and Dalai Lama now?
And where are
	the Moslems who defend life?
And why retain
	compassion now?

Redondo Beach, 1984:
	There’s a picture of my
		tai chi group on the beach.
This
	I remember
		all too well!

Paris 1987:
	A café on the “boul miche”,
		with coffee and scientific dictionaries
and the writings of
	Pierre Boulez,
		by the IRCAM sign.

Nearly three thousand people die:
	For a cause no one understands.
With hand written instructions for piety and
	the roots of liberty are torn from the earth,
in the same week I read about John Adams.

Paris, again, 1989:
	A café on the “boul miche”.
		with a wedding,
thankfully,
	in black
		and white.

Just a few crazed bastards
	choose prayer then death.
Clear-cutting over three thousand
	people.

Valencia, 1982:
	A music degree.
A military industrial complex grows.
	An actor for president.

And the law changes now:
	They can now tap your phone
		by name, not simply number.
The National Guard
	checks
		baggage.

And pity the man who
	visits a pornographic website,
now that they can track the history
	of all his visits.

Big Sur, 1967:
	A seven year old at Esalon?
No. A family trip
to see “General Sherman Tree”.
        Foreshadowing three grown children
		whose liberty now stands shaken.

Considering
	the threats,
Those few crazed bastards
	rightly die.

And where are
	the Pope and Dalai Lama now?
And where are
	the Moslems who defend life?
And why retain
	compassion now?

Los Angeles, 1960
	Would I have come into a world
		so devoid of human values,
for a lost liberty, in a land of sadness,
        had I known and had a soul
               to chose?

As my gift of liberty wanes, I fear.
the pope and Dalai Lama
		and Moslems who defend life
are overshadowed by the evil.
	Tearing the roots of joy from
               the tree of life.

Yet, succumb to fear
	and lose compassion
and WE discard
	the entire infrastructure of humanity!

Los Angeles, 1960:
	I think
I have
	my answer.

And where are
	the Pope and Dalai Lama now?
And where are
	the Moslems who defend life?
And why retain
	compassion now?

September 11, 2001:
	Today compassion was torn from the earth
		like the root-ball of a redwood;
taking with it
	a rich mass of soil
		forty-one years in diameter.


  (c)2013 Dandylines Books [From "The New Poetics of Isolation" ISBN 9781490907659]

Bless you all and may this stand as a memory of both those who died in America today and those who died in 20 years of war that, for a variety or reasons, should not have taken thousands more lives and billions of dollars from our children.

A lot of folks tell me about how important it is to keep a “gratitude journal”. I used to do that but I haven’t for a long, long time. With everything so strange because of COVID and the recent election insanity it’s easy to think that the world sucks. So this Thanksgiving I thought I’d share how easy it is to find gratitude if you just look around.

I can be jealous of people who have more money, bigger houses, cooler cars, etc. I can think I’m not as lucky or not as talented as some. But the fact it, like all of you, I’m blessed. You just need to look around.

“Our goal should be to live life in radical amazement” 

– Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel

For example, here are a few things I’m grateful for…

  • Patt. My wife and life partner of 31 years who was in my Christmas stocking on Christmas Eve 32 years ago and who put’s up with all my unique traits 🙂
  • A brother and sister who still love each other even after 50+ years.
  • My friends from Cafe Marzocca who have made a year of COVID-19 bearable even while standing outside in the rain 6 feet apart and wearing masks. And, who, by the way, share with us cookies and scones from their kids, home made masks, invitations to their fundraisers, lively political discussions, and especially the kindness of lending an ear when I talk too much about myself and my little problems.
  • Eric, the best barista in the world.
  • Johnnie Walker Blue Label – and the fantastic attorney who so graciously gave it to me for my 60th birthday.
  • A Torah Study Group that shows up for class even when thy know I’m teaching instead of clergy.
  • Rabbis that honor me by asking me to lead Torah Study in their absence.
  • My old friends from CalArts who keep me in touch with a past so different from today and so important in my life.
  • SMPTE leadership who gave me the huge honor of asking me to edit 2 issues of the Motion Imaging Journal this year, got me a byline in TVB Europe, and asked me to host a session at the 2020 conference.
  • The old leadership at BlueVolt who gave me a chance to work with them when I needed it.
  • The new leadership at BlueVolt who gave me the chance to continue on and to learn so many new things.
  • My Weight Watchers group who supports me even though I’ve been at my goal weight for, like, 2 years.
  • Doctors Kubicky and Jaboin from OHSU who have become trigeminal schwannoma gurus
  • My guru (speaking of Gurus) whose instructions on meditation I rarely pay enough attention to but who I know won’t ever give up on me and my karma.
  • My dear friend Traci, who is my Oregon sister and always will be.
  • My financial planner who keeps telling me that I may someday retire.
  • The tens of millions of people who agreed with me about the need for a fundamental shift toward empathy and compassion and away from vitriol and voted to change our nation’s leadership.
  • The few Republicans, Libertarians, Objectivists, Evangelical Christians, and others who’s views differ from mine who are willing to discuss issues and philosophies without anger, meanness, or insults. I wish there were more of us on both sides. But, I’m deeply grateful for those I can still speak to, rationally.
  • That I was able to turn our dog Zimrah from a PTSD rescue dog who destroys venetian blinds when not on Prozac into the best canine friend I’ve had since Sydney died.
  • That Bluebell has lived for 17 years.
  • The memory of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, John Lewis, and C.T. Vivian among the many awesome people who left us this year.
  • The memory of my mom, who I miss every day.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Well, friends, as we can see from the all uppercase cry-baby tweets this morning, Dear Leader is a bit out of control and the Democrats have won the “adult For President” part of the election. But you can also see that Dear Leader has lots of lawyering yet to do. So, the presidential battle is not yet won.

We all know that Biden has won the election battle so we who do not think Mr. Trump is the right executive for our country rightly rejoice. But I feel compelled to remind you that the battle for human dignity is still just beginning.

Close to 1/2 of the entire country finds Donald Trump an acceptable representative of the moral compass of our country. The majority of those people actively embrace him. Personally, I know some very smart people and some very loving people who are in that camp. I don’t understand but I know that I have work to do.

What this says is that we have won the political battle but we have lost the moral battle. And, I do mean lost.

People who have never studied world history and who can not spell the name Mussolini have said terrible things to me about my contention that President Trump has been playing from Mussolini’s playbook. They will quickly insult me but just as quickly back away from giving me examples that prove me wrong.

This is not their fault; it is mine.

Why? Because I care about a world without fascism and without dictatorial regimes and if I can’t make that clear to people who I know are intelligent, loving people then I have not done my job.

Now, there will always be neo-Nazi, white-supremacist, evil people in the world. I don’t expect us to change them. What I do expect is that we will not get complacent once Trump is out of the White House. So, today, as I enjoyed a celebratory adult beverage at 10AM and feel good about that. I’m also mindful of the fact that, until I can convince those who are not on the fringe that Trump has been our fastest path to dictatorship, my work is not over.

Alternatively, I can simply choose to believe that 1/2 the country is not particularly smart. That’s the easy way out. But I know from experience that it’s not true. So let’s not be complacent. Let’s keep fighting from a position that I believe to be the moral high ground for a world of freedom and liberty that moves away from, not toward, authoritarianism.

Fifty-Nine year old Cheryl Tiano, was an agent who represented film, TV and game composers at the Gorfaine-Schwartz Agency. She passed away on Monday night, apparently due to complications from heart surgery.

The Society of Composers & Lyricists told Variety:

“Cheryl had long ago taken her place amongst the top tier of composer agents in the entertainment industry. Her clients loved her, and she loved repping them. She is an enormous loss to our media music community.”

I’m sure that’s true. But I did not know her as a rep. I knew her as a joy-filled, very energetic, extremely intelligent member of the CalArts student body in the early 1980’s. I knew her as a friend and as someone who was extremely kind to me in my ancient days as an introverted guy who needed all the extroverts I could find to surround me. Cheryl was wonderful.

Over the past couple decades I have lost several friends and mentors who I dearly loved. My composition teacher and friend Lucky Mosko, his wife the great flutist Dorothy Stone, my friend Art Jarvinen, my best friend in Oregon Pablo Esteve, my tabla teacher Pandit Taranath Rao, and several more. Cheryl now becomes part of that list of those whose memory alone ties me back to an earlier life. I miss that. I am at least as sad about this as when these other dear CalArts friends passed over the years.

Cheryl was one of my “electronic music” colleagues, hanging out in B303 and B304, the Buchla studios at the CalArts of the 70’s and 80’s. In fact, when I had both electronic pieces and chamber music performed in the Composer’s Concert that I call my “graduation recital” Cheryl handled the recordings for me. I used to be a little disappointed that I had to remaster these in ProTools like 20 years later because they were way too hot. Now that seems like a stupid thing to be disappointed in. <sigh>

I remember going to Cheryl’s home for dinner several times. She was a beautiful soul and I’m deeply saddened to hear of her passing. When I think back to my years at CalArts, Cheryl is one of the people I always think of and will always remember. Her passing is a terrible loss to the industry but to me, personally, it’s another loss of someone of whom I hold cherished memories.

One of Cheryl’s clients, Sean Callery, who worked on “24” said it best, I think:

“If God ever needs an agent, he sure has one now.”

Considering what an insane world we live in and how God’s name is used to justify so many odd behaviors by so many people, I imagine She does need a rep who will never put her on hold!

While I can’t imagine them ever reading my blog, I do want to send my deepest condolences to Cheryl’s husband Frank Gerechter, her dad, Hi Tiano (who I’m sure does not remember me but who I remember), and her sister Linda Tiano back east. May her memory be a blessing for all the Tianos and all who came to know her.

z”l

I did not write this but the author gave me permission to share it. In a time of great challenges, Rabbi Shelton Donnell held a Seder via Zoom. Many of us are doing this but Rabbi Donnell’s post-seder thank you note was so touching and educational that I want to share it verbatim.

Next year in Jerusalem (or…. really… anyplace but Cyberspace).

Remember to love your relationships.

Chag Pesach Someach!

 


 

Dear Family and Friends,

Wendy and I want to thank you all for joining us for our Seder last night. To say the least, this was one of our more memorable Passover experiences. These have been very difficult times for all of us, all the more so because we are challenged to reevaluate so many things, activities, and services that we usually take for granted. This has also brought to the fore how important people and relationships are to us. Ironically, the social isolation that prevented us from holding our usual Seder, brought us “together” with many people with whom we rarely have contact. Granted, looking at your faces on a screen simply was not the same as having you in our dining room but, I must say, it made me feel connected to you as well as our tradition, and that was very meaningful for me.

This season marks more than our Passover Seder, tonight we begin the “Counting of the Omer,” the period of seven weeks between Passover (marking the Exodus from Egypt) and Shavu’ot when the Torah was revealed, transforming the ragtag refugees into a people, and a nation with a unique destiny that continues to evolve even today. When the Temples stood in Jerusalem, pilgrims brought the “Omer” — offerings of the first and best of their grain harvest. Centuries later, this joyous period took a dark and traumatic turn. Today, the period of Counting the Omer is observed by traditional Jews as a time for semi-mourning — pleasurable pursuits, new enterprises, and celebrations are suspended, following the customs of those who have lost a loved one. Why? The Babylonian Talmud tells us that during the Roman occupation of the Land of Israel, the conditions for Jews and Judaism were oppressive. Eventually, the Jews rebelled for a second time (the First Revolt from 66 to 70 C.E. saw the Destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem, one of the greatest existential traumas faced by our people). The Second Revolt, led by Bar Kochba, deepened the tragedy and resulted in the Diaspora of the Jewish people and the last gasp of the national aspirations of the Jewish people until the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948.

During the period of the Hadrianic persecutions prior to Bar Kochba’s revolt, we are told that tragedy struck the students of the great Rabbi Akiva. Legend has it that 24,000 disciples died in a very short time. The rabbis of the Talmud attributed the deaths to a lack of mutual respect and concern by the disciples. Another explanation is that the students were brought down by a vicious plague. It is because of this incredibly sad memory that the period of the Counting of the Omer has transformed from a time of unbridled joy to semi-mourning and introspection.

Okay, so why do I bring this up? The story that I just related has a brighter side and a message that I think is very appropriate for us today. According to that same legend, a miracle happened on the thirty-third day of the Counting of the Omer — the plague stopped, and the devastation wrought upon the rabbis and their students ended, enabling them to renew and rebuild the rabbinic tradition that has come down to us today.

I find it interesting that predictions and projections about the trajectory of the coronavirus suggest that we may (please God) see a significant bending of the arc of contagion and death around the time of Lag B’Omer, the day on which we give thanks and celebrate the end of the plague that threatened Judaism itself. And more, the rabbis and their students appear to have learned a lesson about mutual respect and concern, so that they could actively make a positive difference in their situation and persevere against threats both physical and spiritual.

Our gathering last night for our Seder reminds me of the power of the human spirit and the importance of connecting through mutual respect and concern for each other. I believe that it was that faith in the human spirit that enabled our ancestors to survive that ancient plague and go on to thrive as a people, a nation and a faith. For me, that message is a beam of light in these dark times.

Wendy and I want to thank you again and pray that we all will remain safe, healthy, filled with hope and faith that we can do more than survive this modern plague, that we can use the lessons learned from it to make our family, our community, our nation and the world thrive. That, for me, would be a wonderful miracle.

With blessings for a happy and healthy Passover,

Shelton

Every year for our wedding anniversary my wife and I go hunting for a new piece of art for our collection. Sometimes more than once a year. Do you know where I learned to do that?

My Uncle Mel.

In the 1980’s I decided that it was time to stop being a shy, low self-esteem guy so I took an improv comedy class specifically intended to help guys like me, from a guy named Conley Falk. It was called “The Inner Theater”. You know who told me, for the next 30 years, how proud he was to see the changes I made in myself?

My Uncle Mel.

in the late 1970’s and early 80’s I had my electronic and chamber music performed at least once a year when I was in the composition program at CalArts. My parents always came to my concerts. Know who else came to every one of my performances?

My Uncle Mel.

Know who taught me to love basketball? Uncle Mel.

Know who bought me my first set of golf clubs? Uncle Mel.

Who took me to see Luciano Berio conduct the LA Philharmonic? Uncle Mel.

Taught me to love Jazz? Uncle Mel.

To love architecture? Uncle Mel.

Rothko? Mel.

In fact, a few years ago I had the honor of being invited to photograph Chris Rothko’s Family Reunion during the Mark Rothko exhibition at the Portland Art Museum. I spent my whole afternoon hanging with Mark Rothko’s family. I was so excited because just being in the presence of Rothkos was mind-blowing. There is only one person who I rushed to call at the end of that wonderful day.

My Uncle Mel.

One day, well into my adulthood, I was talking about my youth with my uncle Mel and I told him I wish I had studied more technical subjects in High School. I’d become a software engineer and that would have helped me a lot.

You know who looked at me, smiled, called me out on the carpet, and said: “So, are you done rebelling against your dad yet?” Yup……….

Uncle Mel.

I have this really silly photograph of me, in the mid-1980’s, dressed in a ridiculous 1980’s red shirt and white vest, pretending to eat ice cream directly from this big container. That was in the back yard of my Uncle Mel’s house at his 50th Birthday party…. I’m now 9 years older than he was back then.

Mel was the youngest of 4 brothers and the uncle who was closest to me. In retrospect, he was like a second father. I loved all my uncles, all of my family in fact. But, do you know who taught me to love all those people? You guessed it.

Uncle Mel.

Rarely in life does one encounter someone who is 100% genuine, has unqualified love for his entire extended family, and is unconditionally supportive; someone who supports you through bad decisions and celebrates the good ones; who is kind, warm, and loving (even while chasing his brother around the campfire on one memorable backpacking trip); who is truly a good human being. That was my Uncle Mel and I will always cherish his memory.

With me as I write this is one of Mel’s sculptures. Lot’s of the Bilow clan have similar copies. In Uncle Mel’s memory I’ll leave you with this:

2019-05-25_20-15-15_185

זכרונו לברכה

Rest in Peace Uncle Mel! I love you.

 

I’m thinking of writing a book.

I thought I made up a word called “Dataganger” but I Googled it only to find that others have beat me to it. The great news is that I could instantly “Google” it. The bad news is that there is now another bit of data to define my “Dataganger”! I still want to use the word if I ever write the book. Here’s why:

  • Several medical image libraries have gigabytes of image data of my brain.
  • My Alexa insures that Amazon knows when I go to sleep, when I awake, which podcasts I listen to, that I listen to the BBC World Service when I go to bed, when I go upstairs and downstairs, what music I like, what my political views are, and a million more things about me that “she” probably records when I’m not looking.
  • Twitter knows all my political views and all my likes and dislikes.
  • Facebook knows pretty much everything
  • Google knows everything I’ve ever researched about my health, sporting teams, technical interests, and almost everything I’ve ever cared about.
  • Amazon knows all the books I like, what coffee I drink, what toilet paper I buy, what Indian food I like, what watches I wear, what pet food I buy, and, by the way, every product I’ve ever bought at Whole Foods.
  • My Nest thermostat knows what temperature I like any time of the day or night and when I am and am not home.
  • My T-Mobile SyncUp Drive knows every place I drive either of my cars, how fast I drive, how many times I brake too hard, how much time I’m on the road, and how I maintain my cars.
  • My iPhone knows where I am anytime of the day or night, how much I walk, what apps I use, what I like and dislike, and thousands of other bits of telemetry relative to what I am and do.
  • LinkedIn knows everything about my career history, aspirations, and business relationships.
  • My Fitbit knows how much I walk.
  • My watch knows how much I walk and everyone who texts or calls me.
  • My parking lot key card reader knows when I come and go from work.
  • The Harvest app knows everything I tell my company about my work hours.
  • The fingerprint reader on my office door knows whenever I enter or leave the office.
  • My Ring Video Doorbell know who comes to by front door, when, and possibly even why.
  • Comcast Xfinity knows everything thing I watch on every TV in my house.
  • Zillow knows where I live, who my neighbors are, what my house is worth, and the demographics of my neighborhood.
  • My Roku knows anything about my viewing habits that Xfinity doesn’t know, and, since it’s on my Comcast ISP, Comcast has that data too.
  • Ancestry.com has my entire genome.
  • And let’s not even start on Credit Karma!

But wait! There’s more!  The sad fact is that every one of those services has probably sold my data to many others so that they can target me with ads.

So, what’s my point – aside from the fact that I’m over-connected? There are two.

First, In every single case I have done this to myself. I have chosen to exchange my data for one form of convenience or another. I did this by either reading and agreeing to terms and conditions that I have no possible leverage to negotiate, or by not even reading those Ts&Cs. After all, what am I supposed to do, not have a smartphone just because T-Mobile and AT&T won’t negotiate? I knowingly make what could be a really stupid decision every day.

My second, and perhaps more important point is that there is now a distributed data copy of Steve Bilow, floating around Cyberspace. It may be distributed but it’s still privately owned. This is my digital doppelganger and the only one who seems not to own it is ME.

That is what I call my “Dataganger” and I have a lot more to say about it in my next few posts.

There may be a book in my future. Who knows?

(Well, actually, Amazon, Google, Twitter, Facebook, Nest, T-Mobile, Apple, Fitbit, the parking lot and building owners at my place of business, Harvest, Comcast, Zillow, Roku, Ancestry, Credit Karma, and only God knows who else probably have enough data about be to make a pretty accurate inference. So, SOMEBODY probably does know.  Just not me. I own one me… large corporations own the other, the federated, me. That’s the bad news…………..)

 

It’s been well over a year since I last wrote on this subject. Meanwhile my old Radiation Oncologist dumped me and moved to California – Not before sending my new doctor pictures of the nice relaxing trip she had to Hawaii after dumping her old cases, like me, on the poor man!

That’s okay though because my new doctor is a very cool guy named Jerry Jaboin. Dr. Jaboin tells me that not many people study Trigeminals Schwannomas because people think they are boring. Well! To this I say:

“HA! FORGET IT! There ain’t nothin’ about me that’s boring! Not even my fuckin’ intercranial lesion!!! Who you callin’ boring!”

(By the way, great news, this tumor is pushing on my brain tissue so Dr. Jaboin says I can blame that inappropriate burst of profanity on the tumor! See Patt… Told ya. 🙂 🙂 🙂 )

So… seriously… With a few more thousands of dollars of MRIs under my belt here’s what I know:

Nothing.

Well okay…. something. I know that nothing has changed. Not even a little bit. The size of the tumor is identical to what it was 18 months ago. To be clear, that’s not bad. It’s good that it’s not growing and it might even mean that my stereotactic radiosurgery worked a little.

I also learned today that stereotactic radiosurgery actually can be done more than once. It just won’t do any good for me. <sigh>

And, I learned this:

There is stable compression of the left trigeminal ganglion, which is displaced laterally and inferiorly against petrous bone. 

To this I would say “Duh!” if I knew what those words meant 😉 To my credit I can say that I don’t actually think “inferiorly” is a word at all.

And… get this: my  “Intracranial flow-voids are patent.” At first I thought that said “patient” but I know for sure that there is no patience in my brain…. so… that’s not possible.

I was going to show you all my most recent MRI but the images won’t open on this PC. I think it’s intercranial flow-voids are impatient or impotent  or whatever and I need to reboot.

So… look…. the bottom line is that I have no new problems, an awesome new doctor, a new scapegoat for my bad language, and no reason to have another MRI for 12 – 18 months.  Honestly…. that is a good thing.

By the way, Dr. Peggy Mason, Dr. Jaboin think’s he’s met you before. I told him it’s unlikely because you are way too hip to hang out with these BORING schwannomas.

Love you all.

 


 

This just in…. I lied….. Here’s a few views of my little friend….

UntitledApril 2019 MRI

 

 

 

 

 

I’d like to start by apologizing to those of you who are actually engaged followers of my writing. My last post was over 3 months ago and even that was just a reblog. I have found myself in a situation of looking for a new “real job” and everyone I know tells me to be careful of what I write. All of them are correct. After all it’s difficult to undo a first impression and everyone who sees my resume will see my social media. I do need to be cognizant of that. So to my followers, I’m sorry I’ve given you so little.

In theory, since I’m sending around lots of resumes, I also need to begin by welcoming those of you who are here because you want to know if you should interview me. Trust me, you should 🙂 When you look at these posts please don’t focus on the one or two you disagree with or find strange. Rather, consider how refreshing it might be to work with someone who thinks and who has such absolute integrity as to be 110% transparent. You won’t like all you read but you will hopefully find it thought-provoking. That’s what my next employer will get: unconditional integrity, transparency, and intellect. That is who I am. Ok… And I try like heck to be funny too since that is my stress coping mechanism.

Which brings me to the point of this post…

Every firm has resources. Every resource has a cost. Every cost goes on the expense side of a balance sheet. Every balance sheet needs to ultimately represent a profitable, fiscally viable, business. My iPad is a resource. My Mont Blanc pen is a resource. My glass kiln is resource. My house is a resource. My wife and I are resources. But only the last resources I mentioned can have unconditional integrity, humor, love, emotion, empathy, fear, creativity, strategic agility, and compassion. So, in the next few weeks I want to address my contention that humans can’t simply be treated as financial resources. My personal moral-compass points to human value and dignity at exactly true north.

I have been involved with several firms that are in transition. All of them seem to have expense issues at one time or another. Reducing travel expenses so that we “don’t need to make ‘other’ resource reductions”, for example, is a very poorly disguised code for pending layoffs. That was not my particular situation but I’ve been on both sides of the equation and I get it. That said, I propose (and this is where I always thought my PhD dissertation in business ethics – maybe in my next life – should end up) that $1m in travel and $1m in human capital are not equivalent. You can’t ruin a non-human life but you can destroy a family in an instant when you treat human and non-human resources identically. Over the course of this series of posts I will explain why both business ethics and virtue ethics in a business context should be founded on treating humans as inherently higher value than their comparably costed non-human resources.

So… Stay tuned.